Top News

Kim Jong Un shows Trump there are plenty more — or at least one more — fish in the sea
Washington Post

Russia is reportedly working on a longer-range version of the deadly Kalibr cruise missile its adversaries already fear
Business Insider

After the INF Treaty, What Is Next?
Arms Control Association

East Asia

Kim Jong Un Leaves China After Talks With Xi on Trump Sanctions
Bloomberg1/8/2019
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un left Beijing after talking and dining with Chinese President Xi Jinping, according to South Korean media, in a show of unity as they engage in delicate negotiations with President Donald Trump’s administration.

Kim Jong Un shows Trump there are plenty more — or at least one more — fish in the sea
Washington Post1/8/2019
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has issued a veiled warning to President Trump with his surprise visit to China this week: He has other options for economic and diplomatic normalization if their rapprochement falters.

Russia/FSU/Europe

Russia reiterates commitment to keep Iran nuclear deal afloat
Business Insider1/9/2019
Russia is committed to keeping the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), also called Iran nuclear deal, afloat and will ensure “its full implementation,” said the country’s Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Ryabkov here on Wednesday.

Russia is reportedly working on a longer-range version of the deadly Kalibr cruise missile its adversaries already fear
Business Insider1/8/2019
The Russian Navy is apparently developing a new long-range cruise missile, Russia’s state-run Tass News Agency reported Tuesday, citing a source in the military-industrial complex.

Multilateral Arms Control

After the INF Treaty, What Is Next?
Arms Control Association1/8/2019
If the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty collapses in 2019, the United States, key U.S. allies, and Russia will face critical questions of how to respond, including whether to develop and deploy new intermediate-range missile systems and whether to seek restraint measures to prevent a renewed missile race in Europe and beyond.

Opinion and Analysis

Russia’s next moves in Venezuela should be closely monitored
The HillWilliam Courtney
1/8/2019
In December, two supersonic nuclear-capable Russian bombers visited Venezuela, the third such excursion for the warplanes since 2008. Might Moscow intend to pose a threat, perhaps even nuclear, to the Western Hemisphere? If so, how could Washington respond?

Special Interest

NAPSNet Special Report
Nautilus Institute1/8/2019
This workshop concluded that: “[I]ndividuals, organizations, and even states may start to use social media to try to provoke nuclear attacks against their adversaries; or for other political-ideological or religious reasons; that they will be effective in terms of reaching some highly influential people as well as large numbers of people; and included in these two types of readers are likely to be some people making nuclear early warning assessments, and nuclear command decisions” and: “The workshop participants were convinced that social media platforms and social media users can shift the center of gravity away from the current, celebrity-driven and conflict-amplifying social media conflict amplifying dynamic that degrades the quality of much information and towards more reliable, authenticated information while preserving the ability of users to free speech and near-instantaneous networking.