27 entries | Page 2 of 3

Conference

PONI 2018 Summer Conference

The first conference of the 2018-2019 PONI Conference Series will be held on July 10-11 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico.

Event

Assessing the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review

The Project on Nuclear Issues (PONI), with the support of Northrop Grumman Corporation, hosted a half-day conference to discuss U.S. nuclear policy and strategy.

Video

PONI Debate Series

The Project on Nuclear Issues (PONI) and Ploughshares Fund held a debate series on a range of nuclear challenges and policy decisions the Trump administration will face in 2017. The debate series aimed to provide a forum for in-depth exploration of arguments on both sides of key nuclear policy issues.

analysis

A New Euromissile Crisis? NATO and the INF-Treaty Crisis in Historical Perspective

Since February of this year, U.S. officials have criticized Russia for deploying a new dual capable ground-launched cruise missile prohibited by the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. According to General Paul Selva, ‘the Russians have deliberately deployed it in order to pose a threat to NATO.’

analysis

The Road to Nuclear Arms is Paved with Good Intentions: The INF Treaty Preservation Act of 2017

Modernization and expansion of the INF treaty would not only address Russia’s perceived threats, but also provide security assurances to U.S. allies, preserve an important signaling mechanism, and strengthen the nonproliferation regime.

Events

Debate: European Missile Defenses for NATO

The Project on Nuclear Issues (PONI) and Ploughshares Fund are pleased to invite you to the first in a debate series on a range of nuclear challenges and policy decisions the Trump administration will face in 2017. The debate series aims to provide a forum for in-depth exploration of arguments on both sides of key Read More

Conference

The Future of Alliances and Extended Nuclear Deterrence

A survey of the world today finds the nuclear landscape – from Russia, to North Korea, to India, Pakistan, and China – to be more uncertain and precarious than it has been any time since the end of the Cold War. Yet, even as nuclear dangers seem to be growing, there seems to be deepening discontent with the notion of nuclear deterrence. A growing chorus of voices questions the legitimacy of assurance and deterrence, fracturing what might have been thought at one point to be a consensus between allies. There also seems to be a growing skepticism about the benefits of the internationalist system on which deterrence, and especially extended deterrence, depends.